Home Blog

Dos Anjos, Lee To Meet In Rochester Main Event

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/dos-anjos-lee-meet-rochester-main-event
By Thomas Gerbasi
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Tickets for UFC Fight Night, which airs live on ESPN+, go on sale on March 29.

Winner of six of his last eight bouts, a stretch that includes wins over Edson Barboza and Michael Chiesa, Lee made his mark as one of the best lightweights in the world, but now he’s ready to chase gold in the welterweight division, and that quest begins this spring against Brazil’s Dos Anjos, who has won three fights since his own move to 170 pounds.
 

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/dos-anjos-lee-meet-rochester-main-event
By Thomas Gerbasi
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

John Makdessi Knows All About Toughness

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/john-makdessi-knows-all-about-toughness
By Thomas Gerbasi
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

“There’s something about the cold, man,” he said. “It makes you tough.”

The 33-year-old knows all about tough. There’s no other option after training in martial arts since the age of six. But tough isn’t always enough in the fight game, and Makdessi found that out the hard way during a cold streak in 2015-16 when he managed just one win in four bouts.

Subscribe to ESPN+ now!

Social Post

As a member of the UFC roster since 2010, Makdessi didn’t appear to be in jeopardy of losing his spot in the promotion’s lightweight division despite this skid, but nothing is ever set in stone. 

“It’s a rollercoaster ride,” said Makdessi of the prizefighter’s life. But he knows nothing else.

“I really believe in my heart that fighting chose me,” he said. “I think I was born a fighter, that it’s something in my blood. Since I was a kid, all I wanted to do was challenge myself and I was always attracted to martial arts and I kept on going back to it. I always make the joke that MMA is my wife, it’s my girlfriend, it’s my mistress. I eat, sleep and train fighting. It’s something that’s hard to describe to a normal person that doesn’t understand why you would put yourself through this, but I feel like I have a lot to prove, especially to myself.”

As someone who sits behind only Georges St-Pierre, Patrick Cote and Sam Stout when it comes to Canadians with the most fights in the UFC, the Nova Scotia native doesn’t have much, if anything, to prove as he approaches his 16th trip to the Octagon this Saturday against Jesus Pinedo. But what we see from the outside and what a fighter knows on the inside are two different things, and Makdessi knew he was better than that 1-3 skid. So there was still something left to prove, but he had to leave Montreal and his longtime team at the Tristar Gym to find it.

“It was a question of putting my ego aside,” said Makdessi. “When certain things happen to you personally, life teaches you, and life is the hardest lesson. Life is constantly teaching you and there’s no such thing as knowing it all. There’s always something that you don’t know. And once I hit rock bottom in my personal life – emotionally, spiritually, physically – I felt like I hit a dead end and I needed to be reborn.” 

Related: UFC Nashville: On the Rise | UFC Nashville: Fight by Fight

Social Post

Enter Makdessi’s friend and manager, Mitch Mayberger, who suggested “The Bull” relocate to Milwaukee to work with Duke Roufus and his Roufusport squad. Makdessi trusted his friend’s advice, and soon he would come to trust Roufus and his new teammates.

“I forgot everything I knew in the past and I pressed the reset button and took that risk,” said Makdessi. “I took my luggage and came to Milwaukee as a white belt. He (Roufus) took me under his wing, I listened to the coaches, I did the classes, and it was a brand new method, brand new teaching and it was very hard for me. It’s still hard for me because I’m learning a lot of new material. You kind of get naked and put on brand new clothes again. But it’s refreshing and I was born again coming down here. It’s a very hard life because as human beings we all have habits, but I’ve been really focusing on my mentality and my habits. So I put my ego aside and focus on learning every day.”

In his first fight with Roufusport, Makdessi decisioned Abel Trujillo in December 2017. In his second, he looked better than ever in winning a Fight of the Night over Ross Pearson. Just like that, it’s a two-fight winning streak and Makdessi is a player again at 155 pounds. But he’s not resting on his laurels. There’s too much work left to do. Makdessi is no stranger to hard work, though. It’s been his life. And these days, life is good again.

“As a human being, I’m very relaxed, very calm, and I’m a very simple man,” he said. “I’m not trying to be a clown or trying to fake it; I’m just being myself. For me, it’s about the martial arts, the samurai spirit and the discipline. And then as a prizefighter, that’s how I make my living, to go out there and entertain the crowd.”

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/john-makdessi-knows-all-about-toughness
By Thomas Gerbasi
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Thompson: “You’ll See Some Ninja Stuff”

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/thompson-youll-see-some-ninja-stuff
By Gavin Porter
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

And when he goes to war with Anthony “Showtime” Pettis this Saturday at UFC Nashville he will be doing just that.

Pettis is making the move up to welterweight after spending years at featherweight and lightweight. When Pettis made the decision to head up to 170lbs he called for a fight against Thompson and “Wonderboy” was more than happy to oblige the former champion.

“It’s going to be a barnburner I’ll tell you that,” Thompson said. “Anthony Pettis is game. That guy is always game. I don’t know if you saw his last fight with Tony Ferguson but they were both bleeding and him sitting there just smiling looking at the camera like ‘this is what I live for’ and those are the kind of people I like to fight. I like to step across the cage and trade leather with.”

Social Post

Thompson hasn’t fought since last May, when he lost a close decision to recent title challenger Darren Till in Liverpool, England. Early in his fight with Till he injured his knee and had to spend months rehabbing. At 36 years of age, Thompson takes his recovery very seriously and believes that both his mind and body are ready for the challenges that Pettis presents.

“I got a small window to kind of do what I want to do and make sure my knees are healthy,” Thompson said. “So like three months after the fight my knees were actually great, so they are feeling good right now and ready to kick somebody in the head.”

Once the Octagon door closes behind Thompson and Pettis fight fans can expect a striking clinic, one that Thompson eagerly awaits.

“You are going to see some ninja stuff that’s all I’m going to say,” Thompson said. “You’re going to see some really cool ninja stuff. If you’ve ever watched Anthony Pettis, we’ve both got awesome highlight reels and I think this fight is going to bring that out in us. Wanting to see who’s the better striker and who’s the best ninja out there – me or Anthony Pettis and that’s what I have in my head.”

UFC: What was it like to rehab from yet another knee injury and how are you feeling now that camp is over?

ST:  So I ended up injuring my MCL in the first round or second round of the Till fight, which was like ten months ago so I was out for two or three months just for that. You know, I’ve had four knee surgeries on my left knee two on my right, so for some reason this just forever to heal. But everything is great right now. I got my strength and conditioning coach building the knee back up, doing my strength and condition and doing my physical therapy. That’s something that I still do every day just for fear, I’m 36 years old.

UFC: The welterweight division looks very different than it did when you fought Till last. How do you feel about the state of the division?

ST:  The welterweight division is where it’s at to be honest with you.  I mean you had a little hold-up because there was a little debacle between Colby Covington and Kamaru Usman, who was going to get the title next. So everybody was kind of on hold to see if they were going to be that next guy. We’re in a division that I think is more stacked than any other division in the UFC. I mean you got Ben Askren in the mix now who just fought Robbie Lawler, a great fight, a controversial win off of that. Now you got these 155lbs coming up to our division like Michael Chiesa, who just submitted Carlos Condit. And of course “Cowboy” Cerrone and now you got Anthony Pettis coming up to the welterweight division and calling me out. Man it’s exciting, which is why I think the welterweight division is THE division in the UFC. It’s the most exciting division I think.

UFC: Anthony Pettis said he is a fan of your style and what you bring to the Octagon. What does that mean to you?

ST: That is the coolest thing man. To be honest with you, I’ve been a fan of Anthony Pettis for a while now as well. I mean, we have a very similar style in him being a taekwondo stylist, me being a karate guy. I’ve always been a fan of his exciting fights and style man. I mean who walks across a cage and kicks somebody in the face? You know, who does that? That’s like something you see in the matrix or in anime and I’m a huge anime fan so of course I’m going to be a fan. So yeah man this is definitely a fan fight and what better guy to do it than somebody I like to watch fight.

UFC: What does it say about you that you’re willing to take on the best fighters, no matter the circumstances?

ST: That’s why I do what I do. I’m in this game, not for the money and not for the fame but just to face against the best fighters in the world. When I’m talking to my grandkids years from now just to say that I’ve battled with the best fighters in the world, I mean who can say that? That’s freaking awesome. That’s something you’d see like I said, in an anime or something. That definitely puts a smile on my face. That’s just who I am, I’m in the game and will face anybody just because that’s just what I love to do. I want to face the best, I want to prove not just to my fans in the UFC but to myself, that I should be in the Octagon with these people.

UFC: What are some of the keys to victory for you against Pettis?

ST: The goal is to use my wrestling and jiu jitsu to keep the fight standing which has always been my passion. I’ve come from a karate background and I’ve spent many years doing kickboxing and people want to see some body get knocked out. I know that people are getting more educated with the UFC and they’re starting to understand the ground game but, people want to see some body get put to sleep. I mean like this past weekend you saw (Jorge) Masvidal knockout out (Darren) Till and everybody was like “what in the world”. I mean it’s just something different getting a knockout than a submission, you know a submission the guy taps it’s over OK submitted the guy. But when you knock the guy out it’s like “woah” and that’s what fans want to see and what I want to bring ‘em.”

The main card for UFC Fight Night – Thompson vs. Pettis starts at 8pm/5pm ETPT on ESPN+. Make sure you tune in to find out if Thompson can spoil Pettis’ welterweight debut.

If you haven’t subscribed to ESPN+ yet, click here to sign-up for a free 7-day trail.

Gavin Porter is a digital producer and writer for UFC.com, follow him on Twitter at @PorterUFCNews.

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/thompson-youll-see-some-ninja-stuff
By Gavin Porter
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Iaquinta vs Cowboy For Ottawa Main Event

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/iaquinta-vs-cowboy-ottawa-main-event

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

The UFC’s return to Ottawa on May 4 will feature mixed martial arts’ premier action hero, as Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone looks to extend his records for most UFC wins and finishes when he faces fellow lightweight contender “Raging” Al Iaquinta.

Ready to make a run at a world title in his second UFC stint at 155 pounds following a spectacular return win over Alexander Hernandez, Cerrone first has to get by New York’s Iaquinta, who has won six of his last seven bouts on his way to Canadian Tire Centre this spring.

Tickets for UFC Fight Night, which airs live on ESPN+, go on sale this Friday, March 22.

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/iaquinta-vs-cowboy-ottawa-main-event

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

One Day At A Time For Luis Pena

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/one-day-time-luis-pena
By Damon Martin
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

After an injury put a disappointing end to his time on the reality show, the 25-year old prospect got healthy again and made his Octagon debut last July with a dominant first-round victory over former housemate Richie Smullen.

Competing on The Ultimate Fighter also led Pena to his new team at American Kickboxing Academy, where he continued working with UFC heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier, who was his coach on the show.

Following his debut win, coupled with a team known for producing champions, Pena had a lot of hype surrounding his last fight when he took on Mike Trizano, who actually went on to win The Ultimate Fighter season 27. In many ways, Pena saw the fight as his chance to compete for the crown after he was unable to finish the initial tournament due to injury.

Unfortunately, Pena came up short on the judges’ scorecards as he lost a split decision to Trizano, the first defeat of his professional career.
 

Social Post

“I’m not going to lie, I don’t think I fought that great of a fight. I don’t think I had a great performance but, at the same time, re-watching that fight, I don’t necessarily feel like I was beat. I felt like, if anything, I lost the fight, if that makes sense,” Pena explains. 

“I remember there in the cage, I told my coaches going to the corner that I could honestly see this being a draw. When they announced his name, I was a little surprised but, at the end of the day, it’s on me for letting it go to the judges’ hands. It’s on me for not finishing.”

It was the first loss of his career, but the setback didn’t put Pena into some kind of funk after he fell short against Trizano.

Instead, Pena just picked himself up, got back in the gym and started preparing for the next battle ahead. 

“You can’t dwell on stuff like that,” Pena stated. “In this sport, you have to move on.”

In the same fashion that Pena didn’t get bogged down by a single defeat, he’s also not looking too far ahead when thinking about his career prospects in the UFC. 

“If you start looking towards your career and what you think you’re going to do, all that’s going to do is cause you to lose sight of the things in front of you at the time,” Pena said. 

“I don’t really think about it. I just try to live life every day, one day at a time.”

If Pena has a mantra that he follows, that would probably be the one he would wear as a t-shirt because he carries that same attitude into every facet of his career.

Right now, the two biggest things standing in front of Pena are his move down to featherweight and a challenge from Steven Peterson when they clash on the main card at UFC Fight Night from Nashville.

While there is cause and reaction in all of Pena’s decisions, his loss to Trizano last year really played no part whatsoever in his decision to test the waters in the featherweight division.

He didn’t feel overpowered or undersized, but Pena would enjoy having some of those advantages over his opponents, and that’s why he opted to move down to 145 pounds. 
 

“It’s not hard at all for me to make 155. I don’t really have to watch my diet. I just kind of eat whatever I want and just train hard,” Pena said. “With this camp, I actually had to watch what I was eating and make sure I was getting the right nutrients. I haven’t necessarily enjoyed the choice, but I know it’s going to pay off in the end.

“There’s no messing around. It’s not like when I was at 155 and I could kind of do whatever I wanted.”

While he says he is walking around at a similar weight now as he did when competing at lightweight, Pena revealed that he was actually under the 155-pound limit the night before the weigh-ins for his last fight.

This time around, Pena is watching what he eats for the first time in his career, which is also teaching him to be more disciplined as he prepares for the fight against Peterson.

“I feel mentally stronger. I feel more dialed in. I feel ready to go. I feel ready to fight,” Pena said. I can’t say I’m enjoying the move, because I want to get this weight cut over with and get to the fight. 

“I decided to make this move to 145 [pounds] and I think it’s going to pay off in dividends for the rest of my career.”

The first test will be a tough one, as Peterson will come into the fight with four times as much experience, which is exactly what Pena wanted for his initial foray into the featherweight division.

“What a lot of people don’t realize, if you count my fights on the show, Mike was my fifth undefeated opponent in a row. I felt like I’ve been catching myself against some really good guys at that level and I’m ready to jump up to that experience level with Steven Peterson,” Pena said.

“He likes to come forward. He’s the kind of guy that’s right up my alley. The kind of guy that I need to not only bounce back from the loss but make a statement against him. We’re going to get right in each other’s faces and throw down. I think this is going to be a great fight for the fans and a great fight for my career in general. No matter what, I think bonus money is in the picture for me in this fight.”

Pena only had four fights prior to joining The Ultimate Fighter, which means in many ways he’s growing up in the UFC with his third fight in less than a year.

That may seem like a daunting task for some, but Pena embraces the opportunity — and just like everything else in his career, he’s only worried about what is directly in front of him. 

“It’s a challenge I never knew I was going to have to deal with, but very few get to say that they have that challenge,” Pena said. “You have to grow up and you have to mature in front of everybody’s eyes on the biggest stage imaginable in the UFC. 

“But the way I live my life, I just look at it one day at a time. I don’t try to let the gravity of this [situation] get away from me.”

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/one-day-time-luis-pena
By Damon Martin
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Blaydes: “I’m A Legitimate Contender”

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/blaydes-im-legitimate-contender
By E. Spencer Kyte
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

More than two-and-a-half years removed from their first meeting, the two heavyweights were headed in opposite directions. Ngannou entered off back-to-back losses, the first to heavyweight champion Stipe Miocic and the second a perplexing, action-less affair against Derrick Lewis six months later.

Blaydes hadn’t lost since that April 2016 fight in Zagreb, Croatia, which was his first in the UFC. He was unbeaten in his last six and had won four straight, including a lopsided decision win over Mark Hunt and a punishing third-round stoppage win of perennial contender Alistair Overeem five months earlier at home in Chicago at UFC 225.
 

The former NJCAA national champion was on a roll and a win over Ngannou would have put him in good shape to challenge for the heavyweight title at some point in 2019.

The fight was over just 45 seconds after it started, Ngannou having connected with a fierce, sharp series of blows that put Blaydes down and prompted the referee to step in.

In offering his thoughts on the bout on Twitter in the early morning hours after the fight, Blaydes offered no excuses, just an acknowledgement of what transpired, a comment on the nature of the sport and a promise for the future.

“It comes from being further along in this sport,” said Blaydes when asked about his succinct and honest post following the loss to Ngannou. “I don’t see myself as a prospect any longer. I see myself as a legitimate contender and I’ve seen other legitimate contenders lose in similar fashion and bounce back because it’s just part of the game.

“Sometimes you win. Sometimes you lose. When you’re going against another highly skilled athlete, anything can happen; that’s why this sport is exciting and watchable as it is — you never know what’s going to happen.

“That day just wasn’t my day.”
 

Social Post

Roughly four months have passed since that night in Beijing and as is custom, Blaydes is once again poised to step into the cage.

Through his first eight UFC appearances, the longest the 28-year-old has gone between fights is the six months between his first loss to Ngannou and his victory over Cody East in his sophomore appearance in the Octagon. He’s averaged just under four months between fights, a trend which continues as he readies to make the walk to face Justin Willis in the co-main event of the UFC’s return to Nashville this weekend at Bridgestone Arena.

“I don’t think it’s make or break, it’s just something I like,” he said of the developing pattern. “I like to get in there every couple months, after I’ve had a month to really think about what happened in the last fight.

“Regardless of whether it was a win or a loss, I like to have a month to analyze the things I did well and the things I didn’t do well. After that, I like having 12-week camps — that way I know I’ve done the proper amount of preparation and work that needs to be put in to get the win.”

Even with his loss to Ngannou in November, 2018 was clearly a breakthrough campaign for Blaydes, as he registered the two biggest victories of his career and headlined his first UFC event. Reaching those milestones transformed the Elevation Fight Team member from a prospect to a contender and put a bullseye on his back.

After starting his career chasing the biggest fights possible and being the one calling out established names in hopes of expediting his climb up the rankings, Blaydes is now the one being called out.

“It’s a little different,” Blaydes said of being called out by someone looking to change their place in the division at his expense. “I knew it would happen eventually, going from being the hunter to the hunted, but I’m ready for it.

“I expect for guys to be looking to make a name off me now because I’m legit. They know that if they beat me, it makes them legit, so I’m prepared for that.”
 

That’s the approach Willis took to make this matchup with Blaydes come together.

Fresh off his own unanimous decision win over Hunt in early December, the American Kickboxing Academy product set his sights on Blaydes and Alexander Volkov, a pair of Top 5 talents coming off losses. Brandishing an eight-fight winning streak with the last four of those wins coming inside the Octagon, “Big Pretty” sought to take another step up the division ladder in his first start of 2019.

He asked, the UFC offered, and Blaydes obliged.

Now, just a few days before they lock horns, the hungry contender is quick to acknowledge that his surging foe is obviously talented and backed by a standout team, though neither of which will be enough to secure him a victory on Saturday.

“He has a strong left hand and he likes to use it a lot,” said Blaydes, beginning his assessment of what Willis brings to the table this weekend. “He has alright footwork. He doesn’t seem to be extremely athletic, but not a lot of heavyweights are, so I’m not going to hold that against them.

“I respect him. He’s a heavyweight. He’s going to have power and he trains at AKA, so that means he has good grappling partners between Cain and ‘DC,’ so we’re expecting him to be a decent grappler.

“Overall though, I see myself as the better fighter,” he added. “I’m longer, I’m more athletic and I know I’m the better wrestler. I think I check off all the requirements to win the fight. I think I beat him in every area.”

While Willis enters on a lengthy winning streak and with an unblemished record in the UFC, ending his unbeaten run in the UFC isn’t a key motivating factor for Blaydes, as he knows that it will take more than a win over the 10th-ranked heavyweight to get him back into the championship mix.

But with fighting for the title by the end of the year as his goal for 2019, Blaydes knows he needs to get back into the win column this weekend in Nashville in order for that to happen and that’s precisely what he plans to do.

“I think every win is valuable because it goes down on your record, but do I think me beating him will improve my chances for a title shot? No, I don’t think so,” he offered. “I’ll probably need another bigger name after this fight.

“I’d like to hopefully be fighting for the title by December; get on that New Year’s Eve card and be fighting for the belt. I’d probably have to reel off this win and one more against a bigger name — maybe JDS or Stipe, someone like that.

“(As for this weekend), I get it done the same way I have in all my other fights: using my boxing, using my feints, using my footwork to get inside safely without having to eat anything too dirty and once it gets on the ground, it’s muscle memory.

“I don’t think he gets up once I get him on the ground.”
 

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/blaydes-im-legitimate-contender
By E. Spencer Kyte
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Jack Grant vs Jai Herbert for the lightweight title set for CW106

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the CageWarriors.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://cagewarriors.com/jack-grant-vs-jai-herbert-for-the-lightweight-title-set-for-cw106/
Cage Warriors Staff
**This post was automatically retrieved from the CageWarriors.com RSS Feed**

Cage Warriors announce that every bout on the CW106: Night of Champions main card will be a title fight, and the first to be confirmed is Jack Grant vs Jai Herbert for the vacant lightweight belt.

For one night only, London’s iconic Eventim Apollo will open its doors to MMA fans for Cage Warriors 106: Night of Champions on Saturday 29th June. Every fight on the main card will be a title fight, and the first to be announced is set to be one of the most hotly anticipated lightweight showdowns in the history of the division.

Cage Warriors have only staged one other ‘Night of Champions’ event in their history, on a night which saw now-UFC legends Michael Bisping, Dan Hardy and Antonio Silva take home world titles at the Skydome Arena in 2005.

Jack Grant has finished 14 of his 15 wins within the distance, and has picked up devastating knockout wins over both Perry Goodwin and Aleksi Mantykivi during his Cage Warriors run. Jai Herbert possesses equal finishing power, with back-to-back knockouts over Steve O’Keeffe and Joe McColgan in just the last four months alone.

The title on the line has been previously held by two-weight champion Conor McGregor, and numerous other UFC contenders including Chris Fishgold and Stevie Ray.

Jai Herbert lands a right hand against Steve O’Keeffe at CW102

With both men at the top of their game, this fight looks to be an absolutely unmissable addition to what is shaping up to be the biggest night in Cage Warriors history.

“When two guys are tearing through the division like this, it’s always going to be fireworks when they meet,” says Cage Warriors President Graham Boylan.

“The fans have been calling for this one since Jack and Jai first signed with us, and now they’re going to get it along with a whole main card filled with title fights that we’re working on right now.

“No question, this will be one of the craziest cards we’ve ever put together.”

CW106: Night of Champions tickets are on sale

**This post was automatically retrieved from the CageWarriors.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://cagewarriors.com/jack-grant-vs-jai-herbert-for-the-lightweight-title-set-for-cw106/
Cage Warriors Staff
**This post was automatically retrieved from the CageWarriors.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

UFC Nashville Fighters Top 5 Finishes

0

Check out a list of the top 5 finishes from fighters on the Fight Night Nashville card on Saturday featuring Anthony Pettis and Stephen Thompson!

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Anthony Pettis: The World Has To See This

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/anthony-pettis-world-has-to-see-this
By Gavin Porter
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

And at 32 years of age, the former UFC lightweight champion feels like he has plenty left in the tank.

“Some guys get it in their career and some guys get it after their career,” Pettis said. “And they wish like ‘man I understand it now why couldn’t I do it when I had that body, that athleticism’. I’m 32 years old and I understand it so I feel good.”

Part of the reason that “Showtime” is feeling so good is his decision to jump up to welterweight. Pettis fought at welterweight before his WEC days and with the current log-jam at 155lbs he felt that this way the time to make a move.

“I feel like at 170lbs I’m not preparing for a weight cut I’m preparing for a fight,” Pettis said. “I’m healthy, I feel good, I’m not drawn out, I’m not dehydrated and I’m ready to fight. My head’s clear and that’s the best thing.”

In addition to the difficult cut down to make the lightweight limit, Pettis has fought the majority of the guys at the top of the division already.

On Saturday March 24th Pettis will be welcomed to 170lbs by former title challenger Stephen “Wonderboy” Thompson. The two are set to throw down in a thrilling match-up full of striking and creativity. It’s a match-up that excites Pettis.

“Wonderboy’s success with his karate in the Octagon is one of the reasons I chose this fight,” Pettis said. “I’m a fan and I’m a fan of that style because I brought that style in as well. The range fighting, the points, not getting hit and the movement. It’s beautiful to watch and two guys that can do it, it’s something that the fans have to see. Like the world has to see this.”

UFC: You’re coming into the division at an interesting time. Kamaru Usman recently defeated longtime champion Tyron Woodley and there are a couple of fighters on nice win-streaks. Where do you think you are going to fit into this talented group?

Anthony Pettis: Well you see where I jumped right in. Number four in the world. I’m not going to fight somebody top 20. The biggest reasoning behind that, a lot of people were asking me that question as well, 155lbs is jammed up right now. There is a lot to wait on and I fought pretty much everyone in the top 10. I’m not fighting backwards.

UFC: What do you think the fight between you and Wonderboy will be like? What can fans expect?

AP:  I think it’s gonna be a chess match. This guy is very smart with his attacks, he sets everything up, he’s not a wild dude and you know everything is for a reason. I think he is underestimating how big I’m going to be in there, how strong I’m going to be in there. I’m way above him in the grappling division. I don’t see it turning into a grappling fight but it’s kind of up to him. If he wants to make it into a grappling fight I’m ready for that. My game plan striking is going to shock the world. I feel like the way I’m going to attack this fight, no one has seen it before and I’m just going to continue building off of this.

UFC: What makes Wonderboy a dangerous opponent?

AP: I can’t let him control the range. If he controls the range, that’s when it’s an easy fight. And for me, it’s the same thing. Exactly what he looks for is exactly what I used to look for. The range fight, pick my opponents and then the wrestlers started making it harder to do that game plan as where he had the success with it. So I feel if I let him dictate the range, dictate the pace then it’s going to be a tougher fight for me but I’m excited to go out there and do what I’ve been practicing.

UFC: What does the move up to welterweight mean for your career?

AP: This is a new chapter in my career. Look who I’ve fought. I’ve fought the whose who of the UFC. The top of the 145lb, the top of the 155lb and now the top of 170lb. And for me it’s just the challenge. I like the challenge of the excitement of a guy like Wonderboy standing across the cage from me. It makes me motivated to train. And honestly my mindset. Where my mind is at right now, I see everything. When I won the belt I was too immature to understand what I was doing. I didn’t even understand how I was winning these fights but I was doing it. I thought it was because of how I good I was. I tried to rely on how good I was and now I’m losing to guys who are doing the details, the little things right that make these fights a win or a loss.

UFC: What’s an important key to victory for you in this fight?

AP: Details. I can’t think about landing a punch, landing a kick it has to be controlling these little positions that’s going to allow me to land this kick eventually. I can’t be greedy. Initially I’m not going to go out there greedy I’m going to be persistent, I’m going to be consistent with my game plan but I can’t be greedy. I have to let it marinate, let it mature then once it’s there then look for the knockout. Like I can’t go for it right away. That’s the stuff that I’ve been talking about, the patience and the understanding of how to train for that. It’s like a different level of cardio, where it’s a mental cardio. Like I can’t break this mental cardio, it’s not a physical thing. I just have to be able to do this for 25 minutes and then I might get one minute of him breaking then I show it.

The main card for UFC Fight Night – Thompson vs. Pettis starts at 8pm/5pm ETPT on ESPN+. Make sure you tune in to find out if Pettis’ welterweight debut goes according to plan.

Gavin Porter is a digital producer and writer for UFC.com, follow him on Twitter at @PorterUFCNews.

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/anthony-pettis-world-has-to-see-this
By Gavin Porter
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Five Questions with Maycee Barber

0

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/ufc-nashville-five-questions-with-maycee-barber
By Zac Pacleb
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

“I love the way she talks,” White told Olivi. “When I say, ‘talks,’ I love the way she texts me and the crazy stuff she says to me. She wants to be a world champion. I love these types of things and these types of people.” 

How exactly does a 20-year-old balance this brash persona with patience in her pursuit of the title? In Barber’s eyes, there isn’t really any other way to do it.

“You can’t really be afraid of that because I chose this life, and I’m enjoying it all the time,” Barber said. “You have the good days. You have the bad days. You have the hard days. You have the days where you feel like, ‘Man, I’m on top of the world.’”

Barber said she plans to spend a year fighting at flyweight before moving back down and chasing the strawweight belt currently held by Rose Namajunas. Who holds the belt at that point isn’t certain, especially with Jessica Andrade challenging for the strap at UFC 237. What does seem likely – based as much on her words as her actual performance – is that Barber will be closing in on her opportunity for a title shot. 

“If you’re confident and you’re enjoying the process and you realize this is why I’m doing this and this is what I’m going for and this is what’s going to help me help them or help me help my family or my siblings or my future family, I feel like that all together is what makes it worth it.”

UFC: After having some time to digest your first win, seems like you’ve been able to travel some and train in different places. What have you been up to since making your debut?

Maycee Barber: The last few months after my fight in November, I went out and did some testing at the (UFC Performance Institute) and got some good information about where I need to be and what I need to do for the next fights coming up, and after that,  I moved to Wisconsin. I’ve been traveling around, yes I have, a lot. I moved to Wisconsin, then I got the fight with JJ Aldrich, and so now I’m back in camp, so I went out to Utah and did some training with Matt Pena, one of my boxing coaches, and then I just continued camp with Marc Montoya at Factory X in Denver, and it’s been huge. It’s been awesome. A lot of training. I haven’t been home. I haven’t seen my family in quite some time, so I’m ready to see my family, but yeah. Florida, I went to the Daytona 500. That was an incredible experience getting to be around all the athletes there and to see the level of mentality that they have as professionals, and that was really cool. And now, I’m here in Vegas for the Jon Jones and Anthony Smith fight and for some media and for some of my own training and continuing camp because obviously Anthony has Marc, and Marc is my head coach as well, so I just kind of had to follow along.

UFC: Your plan after your fight in November was to move to Wisconsin to work on nutrition, and obviously you came to the PI to get information as well. What did you learn?

MB: Being here at the PI, it’s been incredible. The preparation that we’ve had to make and the changes that we’ve had to make are the weight class. I had to move up from 115 to 125. It’s not ideal, but we found out that my metabolism was wrecked, and so we had to make some changes for my health specifically, so that’s what we did. It’s not a perfect world. In a perfect world, I would still be fighting at 115, but I also feel like a beast at 125, and I feel good. I feel strong, and weights coming down. I’m way healthier now. That’s probably the biggest change that we’ve made is the weight class.

UFC: So you’re at 125, is the plan to move back down at some point?

MB: Yeah. So, I’ll probably spend the next year (at flyweight) or so until I’m completely healed. So right now, I’m back out here testing more, and I’m not even halfway back to where we want me to be, so it’s a process. Any time you go and you diet down and you put such stress on your body for dieting and training and as an athlete, however long it took to get there, it’s going to take that much time to get it back, so I have quite a long journey of recovering, and then after that, I’ll definitely go back down to 115.

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**
This is the original article:
https://www.ufc.com/news/ufc-nashville-five-questions-with-maycee-barber
By Zac Pacleb
**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed**

Powered by WPeMatico

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Latest article

Dos Anjos, Lee To Meet In Rochester Main Event

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed** This is the original article: https://www.ufc.com/news/dos-anjos-lee-meet-rochester-main-event By Thomas Gerbasi **This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS...

John Makdessi Knows All About Toughness

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed** This is the original article: https://www.ufc.com/news/john-makdessi-knows-all-about-toughness By Thomas Gerbasi **This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS...

Thompson: “You’ll See Some Ninja Stuff”

**This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS Feed** This is the original article: https://www.ufc.com/news/thompson-youll-see-some-ninja-stuff By Gavin Porter **This post was automatically retrieved from the UFC.com RSS...